Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Portland residents

Portland Oregon residents identifying solely as Asian Americans account for 7.1% of the population; an additional 1.8% is partially of Asian heritage. Vietnamese Americans make up 2.2% of Portland's population, and make up the largest Asian ethnic group in the city, followed by Chinese (1.7%), Filipinos (0.6%), Japanese (0.5%), Koreans (0.4%), Laotians (0.4%), Hmong (0.2%), and Cambodians (0.1%).[87] There is a small population of Yao people that live in Portland. Portland has two Chinatowns, with New Chinatown located along SE 82nd Avenue with Chinese supermarkets, Hong Kong style noodle houses, dim sum, and Vietnamese phở restaurants.[88]

With about 12,000 Vietnamese residing in the city proper, Portland has one of the largest Vietnamese populations in America per capita.[89] According to statistics there are 21,000 Pacific Islanders in Portland, making up 4% of the population.[90]

An ethnic distribution map of Portland, Oregon based on the 2010 census. Each dot represents 25 people, with red dots representing whites, blue representing blacks, green representing Asians, orange representing Hispanics, and grey representing all other races.
Portland's population has been and remains predominantly white. In 1940, whites were over 98% of the city's population.[91] In 2009, Portland had the fifth-highest percentage of white residents among the 40 largest U.S. metropolitan areas. A 2007 survey of the 40 largest cities in the U.S. concluded that Portland's urban core has the highest percentage of white residents.[92] Some scholars have noted the Pacific Northwest as a whole is "one of the last Caucasian bastions of the United States".[93] While Portland's diversity was historically comparable to metro Seattle and Salt Lake City, those areas grew more diverse in the late 1990s and 2000s. Portland not only remains white, but migration to Portland is disproportionately white.[92][94]

No comments:

Post a Comment